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When Your Book Generates Controversy

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With Melanie Solomon, author of AA-Not the Only Way; Your One-Stop Resource Guide to 12-Step Alternatives

DOWNLOAD AND LISTEN TO MELANIE SOLOMON MP3 HERE

Melanie Solomon is the author of AA-Not the Only Way; Your One Stop Resource Guide to 12-Step Alternatives. She battled a ten year addiction and was unsuccessful in her attempts to recover through traditional 12-step programs. She finally gained control of her cravings and her life after a near-death experience led her to the conclusion that Alcoholics Anonymous could not be the only way. Her research into alternative methods of treating addiction led her to writing and self-publishing her book, which has since been picked up by a publisher.

Solomon teaches at the Huntington Beach School District Drug and Alcohol Program and will be leading a workshop at The Learning Annex in San Diego and Los Angeles at the end of April. The workshop is open to those struggling with a drug or alcohol problem, their family members, and addiction professionals who want to learn more about the options that are now available.

In this candid interview, Melanie explains:

  • How writing her book changed her life
  • How the book has generated controversy
  • How she has been handling the controversy
  • How her self-published book was picked up by a publisher
  • How she’s been marketing the book non-stop
  • How, when she decided to do a book, she did everything in the wrong order
  • How she keeps going even when she’s overwhelmed with work and attacked by critics.

Interviewee: Melanie Solomon
Host: Paula B.
Date: March 20, 2006
Running time: 42:11 minutes
File size: 33 megabytes
Rating: PG (subject matter)
Melanie Solomon’s Web site: www.aanottheonlyway.com

 

DOWNLOAD AND LISTEN TO MELANIE SOLOMON MP3 HERE

2 Responses to “Podcast: When Your Book Generates Controversy”

  1. TimK Says:

    Hi, Paula. Great show and an inspirational story, for anyone who dreams of changing the world.

    Interviewers who ask a question and then talk over the answer: I hate these. I’m glad you don’t do this. To interviewers who do this: Your listeners want to hear the answers. They could listen to you rant without taking up someone else’s time. Speaking of which, he made himself available to answer your questions. He’s doing you a favor. Show him respect.

    As an interviewee, I wonder whether these interviews are even worth doing. Any listener worth having is going to want to hear a two-way discussion, not a rant by the host. And if the listeners really just like to hear the host tear into his guest, he probably has few listeners worth having.

    -TimK

  2. Administrator Says:

    Hi, Tim,

    I’m glad you enjoyed Melanie’s interview. I think there are two kinds of interviewers: journalists and those with a personal agenda. Obviously, Melanie encountered some of the latter when she went on various recovery shows. I did listen to her interview with Monty, and even though he challenged her, he was polite and did listen.

    For an interviewee, it’s not always easy to know ahead of time what you’re getting into. I did some radio shows a couple of years ago for one of my books, and I was astonished when one host started acting like a real idiot. That had never happened to me before, and I was thrown for a loop. Now I know that it could happen anytime for any reason, which helps me prepare.

    It’s sad that some of these “hosts” get a lot of attention when they behave badly, which translates into high ratings.

    Paula B.